Christ as foolishness

Is it logical/illogical to believe/not believe in God?

The Bible itself, ladies and gentlemen, says that based on logic, reason and science, it is foolishness to believe in the cross of Christ. Is it logical to believe that one man dying on a Roman cross as thousands of others did can make a bit of difference what happens to me when I die 2,000+ years later? No. Do I believe it makes a difference? I’m betting my afterlife on it.

Paul’s letter we call I Corinthians says that the preaching of the cross is foolishness.  That’s a little KJVish, but it still comes out “folly” in the ESV.  It’s okay, it means foolish.  It actually says in Chp 1 v. 18 “…folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”  We know that it sounds a little foolish to believe in the power of the cross; it’s because God designed his plan of salvation that way.  To “confound the wise of the world.”  Verse 21 says “For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, it pleased God through the folly of what we preach to save those who believe.”  Saving knowledge of Christ requires a faith outside of reasoning and logic.  If we could prove through geometric proofs and scientific findings that God is real, exists, created and maintains the universe, then anyone open to reason would have to believe it.  Never gonna’ happen, folks.  Because in God’s plan, he’s looking for the faithful; people faithful to Him no matter what, including when having faith doesn’t make sense.  Verse 27: “But God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong.”  Christ’s death on the cross looks like defeat to the world; logic tells you that Christ’s work is done, his ministry cut short on Calvary.  But in Christ’s weakness, the plan of God for salvation was carried out.  If Jesus had appeared to Pilate with a fanfare of trumpets and flashes of lightning and said to his face “I told you so,” he would have had no choice but to believe.  God never leaves us with no choice.  He will save those of faith, and the unfaithful who rely on their own understanding will perish.

I think it’s reasonable to believe that God might exist, and based on my own research and experience, I believe the Christian God of the Bible is the right one (thanks internet monk).  It is illogical to say that no god could possibly exist.  But at some point the debate over reason and logic no longer applies, as the God of the universe exists beyond our ability to reason or even imagine.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Christ as foolishness

  1. Like I mentioned on the post on my blog, the verses you mentioned are great. Great post. I wonder why I didn’t write it. Haha.

  2. Well Clark I have to jump in for the other side. Now I’m not challenging your beliefs in any way shape or form, I’m simply stating another point of view. I have seen this phrase before, “I betting my afterlife on it” and I have to disagree. The real bet or gamble if you will, is on the side of the unbelievers. If you say you are betting then you would potentially have something to lose, in this case you don’t. If you happen to be wrong, what happens? Nothing. But if an unbeliever is wrong they are sentenced to hell for all eternity. I would say you aren’t taking much of a gamble at all in regards to your afterlife, however; you are betting your life on it. If you are right, which I believe you think you are, than your afterlife will be immensely rewarding but your life may seem unfulfilling. Hypothetically, the unbeliever may have an extraordinarily rewarding life but they are risking or betting an eternal afterlife. Would you agree?

  3. I guess, in order to clarify why I responded with an argument about the afterlife, is because I was unable to respond to the entire post, without writing a book. I didn’t think you would want that, so I picked the first argument in which I could write a respectable response. However, if responded to correctly, which merely implies that I predict one out of a few possible responses, it will lead to the remainder of your original post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s