Separation of Church, State and Twitter

Read the full story here (CNN).  The issue is over Rep John Shimkus (R- IL) posting Bible verses daily on his Twitter account.  Political activist Barry Lynn claims that Shimkus tweeting Bible verses is a violation of separation of church and state.  My argument is that the only people reading the verses are the 3,000 or so followers who subscribe to receive the tweets.  There is no violation here.  Hundreds of comments took the same or similar positions, including those of atheists, agnostics, and those simply identifying themselves as non-Christian.

The establishment clause states that Congress shall make no law establishing a religion.  Sending personal tweets is not a legislative procedure.  Shimkus is also granted the first amendment right to express himself and exercise his religious beliefs freely.  Again, he is not quoting the Bible on the floor of Congress but in tweets read by his followers.  Does anyone care to weigh in, or is this matter too cut and dried to debate?

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4 thoughts on “Separation of Church, State and Twitter

  1. Most reasonable people, regardless of religious belief, would say that restricting freedom of speech in favor of a logic-twisting argument is a very bad thing. But that never stopped the crazies from trying before.

  2. Pingback: Separation of Church, State and Twitter (via The Master’s Table) « Mariamz

  3. I am a Non Religious Christian.
    I do believe in separation of church and state.
    I do not see where John Shimkus violated
    this separation.
    His twitter account is personal, it is not job
    related. therefor he can post bible verses or
    any other religious material he chooses and
    it does not affect the state in any way.
    any one who does not like his posts has
    the option of going elsewhere.
    We are however violating his freedom of religion
    if and freedom of speech we intervene in his
    personal internet posts.

  4. Daniel, I took a look at your site. Michael Spencer’s book Mere Churchianity describes the idea your blog tries to get across, the difference between being a follower of Christ (Christianity) and a member of or follower of some churches teaching, “churchianity.” I’m sure it confuses a lot of people, but I get it.

    And thanks for installing my button. I noticed right away!

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