Imagine/ Reimagine

imagineJohn Lennon’s Imagine is a beautiful song.  It has more than a meaningless catchy hook; the music, the molody, the lyrics are beautifully composed.  It’s one of those songs that has stood the test of time and continues to move audiences today.  (Here’s a link if you must.)

I mentioned it is not meaningless, right?  The song is beautiful to listen to but it’s the substance that should offend Christian sensibilities.  If an angry atheist were shouting on the street corner that there is no God, we would certainly notice.  Perhaps argue with him.  But Imagine shares the same message – that without religion the world would be a better place – in a much more palatable form.  I enjoy hearing the song even though I disagree with it’s philosophy.  Many have probably heard it without listening to it.  “Imagine there’s no heaven.”  I’d rather not.

I submit for your approval Reimagine.

Blogger Flagrant Regard (his first name is Martin, but that’s all I know) has taken what we like about Imagine but asks the listener to do the opposite.  Realize there is a heaven to gain, a hell to shun, and that Calvary makes all the difference.  Hear the Gospel of Jesus Christ and realize that he is not the problem but the solution.  The Gospel is Good News; it is the cure and not the disease.

Please read the backstory in the author’s own words.  Props to our friend Paul for sharing.

The Body of Christ

John Lennon’s quote that “we are more popular than Jesus” sparked controversy and protest once it reached the United States.  That statement, part of a much larger discourse, was taken terribly out of context.  Here’s what Lennon really said:

Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue about that; I’m right and I’ll be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first—rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me.

Lennon was commenting on the decline of Christianity in England (and all of Europe for that matter) and over there no one even got upset.  In it’s context, what Lennon was saying was true. Continue reading

More Popular than Jesus

Update: this is a very good introduction.  Read the whole thing here.

Yesterday, Oct. 9, would have been John Lennon’s 70th birthday.  Huge crowds gathered across the street from his former New York apartment, at the appropriately named Strawberry Fields Park.  He’s still fondly remembered, both here and in the UK, some 30 years after his death.  Google honored his birthday with their first animated doodle.

Back in 1966, protests and violence erupted in the United States after Datebook quoted Lennon on the cover of their magazine saying that the Beatles had become “more popular than Jesus.”  Concerts were cancelled, KKK members rallied, the Fab Four once thought they were the target of gunfire.  Well… here’s what Lennon had really said:

Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. I needn’t argue about that; I’m right and I’ll be proved right. We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first—rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me.

We still remember Lennon 30 years later; and despite what you see on the covers of Time, U.S. News & World Report and so on every Easter, Christians still remember Jesus some 2,000 years later.  Lennon had studied many religions extensively.  There are much more vocal enemies of Christian faith today than anything he said back then.  Perhaps he was just ahead of his time.

“His disciples were thick and ordinary.”  Yes they were; and yes we are.  And we the body of Christ.  That my friends is the Gospel.